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‘Understanding Psychosis and Schizophrenia’ Launch Conference

Thursday 27 November 2014 at Friends Meeting House, London

Launch Images

Main Audience: journalists, service users and families, mental health charities, professionals, clinical psychologists

Please click here for an agenda.

This conference marks the publication, on the same day, of a report by the BPS Division of Clinical Psychology entitled ‘Understanding psychosis and schizophrenia: why people sometimes hear voices, believe things that others find strange, or appear out of touch with reality, and what can help’. It has been written by a group of eminent clinical psychologists drawn from eight universities and six NHS trusts, together with service users, brought together by Consultant Clinical Psychologist Anne Cooke. The report is a distillation of the current state of knowledge, and is intended for a public audience including service users, their friends and families, policymakers and journalists. Its conclusions challenge received wisdom about the nature of mental illness, suggesting that psychosis can be understood and treated in the same way as other psychological problems such as anxiety or shyness. There is no dividing line between ‘psychotic’ experiences and normal thoughts, feelings and beliefs. Hearing voices or feeling paranoid are common experiences which can often be a reaction to trauma, abuse or deprivation. Calling them symptoms of mental illness, psychosis or schizophrenia is only one way of thinking about them, with advantages and disadvantages. It is a myth that people who have these experiences are likely to be violent. Recent research suggests that antipsychotic medication, whilst very helpful for some, also carries significant risks, particularly if taken long term. Surprisingly few services currently offer people the chance to talk in any detail about their experiences and to make sense of what has happened to them. Whilst NICE (the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence) suggests that this opportunity is vitally important and recommends that everyone should be offered psychological therapy, only a small minority actually are. Services need to change radically, and we need to invest in prevention by taking measures to reduce abuse, deprivation and inequality.

The report is illustrated with paintings by the artist Anita Klein and will be freely available to download from the DCP website and also from www.understandingpsychosis.net. Anita will be at the conference, together with the editor Anne Cooke and most of the contributors, who will talk about the motivation behind the report and its most important implications. Journalists, service users, policymakers and politicians will also be present and all are welcome.

“We welcome this report which highlights the range of ways in which we can understand experiences such as hearing voices. Anyone of us can experience problems with our mental health, whether we are diagnosed or not. People describe and relate to their own experiences in very different ways and it’s important that services can accommodate the complex and varied range of experiences that people have. This can only be done by offering the widest possible range of treatments and therapies and by treating the person as whole, rather than as a set of symptoms.”
Beth Murphy, Head of Information: Mind

Agenda

Thursday 27th November 2014

Official launch of the Division’s new report ‘Understanding Psychosis and Schizophrenia’
Draft Programme

09:00Coffee and Registration
09:30Official launch of the Division’s new report ‘Understanding Psychosis and Schizophrenia’ Session Chair – Prof Peter Kinderman, Contributor and Former DCP Chair
09:40Jacqui Dillon – The Tale of an Ordinary Little Girl
10:00Anne Cooke, Co-ordinating Editor of the report – What we are saying
10:10Dr Geraldine Strathdee, National Clinical Director for Mental Health – Developing psychologically informed services for people experiencing psychosis
10:20Luciana Berger, Shadow Minister for Public Health and Mental Health - Our shared vision for humane, effective and well-resourced psychological health services.
10:30Sam Challis, Information Manager, Mind – Information is Power: the importance of access to knowledge about different ways of understanding psychotic experiences
10:40Antonia Borneo, Head of Policy and Development, Rethink Mental Illness - Rethink Mental Illness: how we can help make sure people get the psychological support they need
11:00Richard Pemberton, DCP Chair and Jo Hemmingfield, DCP England Lead for Service User and Carer Partnership Working - Thanks on behalf of the Division of Clinical Psychology
11:10Questions from audience Chair: Prof Peter Kinderman
11:30Coffee

Thursday 27th November 2014

Start of Conference
Throughout the conference Dr Stuart Whomsley, DCP Media and Communications Lead, will be running a press office in a separate room. Contributors will be available for interview.

12:00Conference Session 1: Psychological approaches to psychosis Session Chair – Prof Mary Boyle, Contributor
12:00Anne Cooke, Report Editor – Welcome and why we wrote this report
12:10Prof Richard Bentall – A whistle stop tour through 30 years of psychosis research in psychology
12:30Dr Rufus May – The hidden meanings in what we call psychosis
12:50Questions and discussion
13:00Lunch
14:00Conference Session 2: How this report will help change things for the better Session Chair: Caroline Cupitt, DCP Faculty for Psychosis and Complex Mental Health, Contributor
14:00Caroline Cupitt Welcome on behalf of the DCP Faculty for Psychosis and Complex Mental Health
14:10Rai Waddingham, ISPS UK, Mind in Camden and Hearing Voices Network - A reality check? What this report means for people with lived experiences seen as psychosis
14:20Prof Elizabeth Kuipers, Contributor and Chair of NICE Schizophrenia Guideline Group What NICE recommends and why, and why this report matters
14:30Dr Alison Brabban, Clinical Lead, Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) for Severe Mental Illness programme, Department of Health – How psychosis services in the UK will change over the next ten years
14:40Questions and discussion
14:45Tea
15:15Conference Session 3: In conversation Session Chair and Facilitator: Prof Tony Lavender, Contributor
15:15Prof Tony Lavender - Welcome on behalf of Canterbury Christ Church University
15:25Contributors on Stage - Why they contributed, one important message of the report and one thing they will hope it will achieve
16:05Questions and discussion with the audience
16:45Close

Speakers and Facilitators

Speakers & Contributors

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Anne Cooke

Speaker
Anne Cooke is a consultant clinical psychologist who worked in the NHS for many years with people distressed by the types of experiences that are the subject of this report. She is now Principal Lecturer and Clinical Director of the Doctoral Programme in Clinical Psychology at the Salomons Centre for Applied Psychology, Canterbury Christ Church University. With Professor Peter Kinderman, she was also co-ordinating editor of the previous report on which this one builds, Recent Advances in Understanding Mental Illness and Psychotic Experiences, published in 2000. She was a co-editor of Understanding Bipolar Disorder, a Division of Clinical Psychology report published in 2010. She is active on Twitter (@AnneCooke14) and blogs at Discursive of Tunbridge Wells.
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Prof Richard Bentall

Speaker
Richard Bentall is a professor at the Institute of Psychology, Health & Society, University of Liverpool and was recently elected a Fellow of the British Academy. He is author of ‘Madness Explained’ (200) and ‘Doctoring the Mind’ (2009).

http://www.liv.ac.uk/psychology-health-and-society/staff/richard-bentall/

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Emeritus Prof Mary Boyle

Speaker
Mary Boyle is Emeritus Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of East London where she was was Head of the Doctoral Programme in Clinical Psychology for over 20 years. She also worked as an NHS Clinical Psychologist in adult services and in women’s health. Her main areas of research and scholarship are in critical clinical psychology, especially in critiques of medicalisation of distress and psychiatric diagnosis. She is the author of ‘Schizophrenia: A Scientific Delusion ?’ (Routledge, 2002’ and has also published widely in feminist approaches to women’s health, particularly contraception, abortion and disorders of sexual development. She is interested in raising public awareness of the problems of traditional psychiatric approaches to emotional and behavioural difficulties and is currently engaged in projects developing alternatives to psychiatric diagnosis.

http://www.uel.ac.uk/psychology/staff/maryboyle/

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Caroline Cupitt

Speaker
Caroline Cupitt is a consultant clinical psychologist with Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust specialising in assertive outreach. She has worked in assertive outreach since 1996, in both statutory and non-statutory settings, and is particularly interested in fostering psychological approaches.

http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415454070/

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Jacqui Dillon

Speaker
Jacqui Dillon is a respected speaker, writer and activist, and has lectured and published worldwide on trauma, psychosis, dissociation and recovery. Jacqui is the national Chair of the Hearing Voices Network in England, Honorary Lecturer in Clinical Psychology at the University of East London, Honorary Research Fellow in the School of Medicine, Pharmacy and Health, Durham University and Visiting Research Fellow at The Centre for Community Mental Health, Birmingham City University. Jacqui is the co-editor of Living with Voices, an anthology of 50 voice hearers stories of recovery, Demedicalising Misery: Psychiatry, Psychology and the Human Condition and the 2nd Edition of Models of Madness: Psychological, Social and Biological Approaches to Psychosis. She has published numerous articles and papers, is on the editorial board of the journal Psychosis: Psychological, Social and Integrative Approaches and a foreign correspondent for Mad in America. Jacqui is also a voice hearer. See www.jacquidillon.org

http://www.jacquidillon.org/

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Prof Daniel Freeman

Speaker
Daniel Freeman is a Professor of Clinical Psychology, a Medical Research Council (MRC) Senior Clinical Fellow, and a British Psychological Society Fellow, in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Oxford. He is also a consultant clinical psychologist in Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust and a Fellow of University College Oxford. He has published extensively on the psychological understanding and treatment of psychosis, and is the lead author of several books including Overcoming Paranoid and Suspicious Thoughts (2006), Paranoia: the 21st Century Fear (2008), Know Your Mind (2009), You Can Be Happy (2012), How to Keep Calm and Carry On (2013) and The Stressed Sex (2013).

http://www.psych.ox.ac.uk/team/PIs/daniel-freeman

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Prof Philippa Garety

Speaker
Professor of Clinical Psychology, Kings College London Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience and Clinical Director and Joint Leader of the Psychosis Clinical Academic Group, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, King’s Health Partners.

http://www.iop.kcl.ac.uk/staff/profile/default.aspx?go=10562

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Dr David Harper

Speaker
David Harper is Reader in Clinical Psychology and Programme Director (Academic) on the Professional Doctorate in Clinical Psychology at the University of East London (UEL). He is a co-author of Psychology, Mental Health & Distress (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013) and Deconstructing Psychopathology (Sage, 1995) and a co-editor of Qualitative research methods in mental health and psychotherapy: An introduction for students and practitioners (Wiley, 2012). He is editor of Beyond ‘delusion’: Exploring unusual beliefs and experiences (ISPS/Routledge, forthcoming). He was a member of the British Psychological Society working party on the reform of the Mental Health Act and is a member of the editorial collective of Asylum: The Magazine for Democratic Psychiatry.

http://www.uel.ac.uk/research/profiles/psychology/davidharper/

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Dr Lucy Johnstone

Speaker
Dr Lucy Johnstone is a consultant clinical psychologist, author of 'Users and abusers of psychiatry' (2nd edition Routledge 2000) and co-editor of 'Formulation in psychology and psychotherapy: making sense of people's problems' (Routledge, 2nd edition due in August 2013) and ‘A straight-talking guide to psychiatric diagnosis’ (PCCS Books), along with a number of other chapters and articles taking a critical perspective on mental health theory and practice. She is the former Programme Director of the Bristol Clinical Psychology Doctorate and was the lead author of the 'Good practice guidelines on the use of psychological formulation' (Division of Clinical Psychology 2011.) She has worked in Adult Mental Health settings for many years and is currently based in a service in South Wales. She is an experienced conference speaker, lecturer and trainer.
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Prof Peter Kinderman

Speaker
Peter Kinderman is Professor of Clinical Psychology and Head of the Institute of Psychology, Health and Society at the University of Liverpool. He is also an honorary Consultant Clinical Psychologist with Mersey Care NHS Trust. His most recent publications are: Kinderman P (2014) A Prescription for Psychiatry: Why We Need a Whole New Approach to Mental Health and Wellbeing. Palgrave Macmillan, London. [ http://www.palgrave.com/page/detail/a-prescription-for-psychiatry-peter-kinderman/?K=9781137408709 ]. Kinderman P (2014) New Laws of Psychology: Why Nature and Nurture Alone Can't Explain Human Behaviour. Constable & Robinson, London. [ http://www.constablerobinson.com/?section=books&book=the_new_laws_of_psychology_9781780336008_trade_paperback ]. He has recently launched a free, online, open-access course exploring our understanding of mental health and well-being. [ https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/mental-health-and-well-being ].

http://www.liv.ac.uk/psychology-health-and-society/staff/peter-kinderman/

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Prof Elizabeth Kuipers

Speaker
I have been a Professor of Clinical Psychology at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s College London, since 1998, and worked as an honorary Consultant Clinical Psychologist in a local adult psychosis team in the South London and Maudsley (SLAM) NHS Foundation Trust, until 2012. I was the founding director of Picup, now Directed by Dr Emmanuelle Peters, which is part of the SLAM IAPT-SMI (increasing access for psychological treatments for severe mental illness) demonstration site for psychosis.
I trained at Bristol, Birmingham and London University, and with colleagues, developed and evaluated first, family interventions for psychosis, and then cognitive behavioural therapy for individuals with psychosis. I was Chair of the 2009 NICE guideline for Schizophrenia update, and the NICE guideline for Psychosis and Schizophrenia 2014. In 2013, I received 2 lifetime achievement awards, from WISE (Women in Science and Engineering) and the BPsS (British Psychological Society).

http://www.iop.kcl.ac.uk/staff/profile/?go=10625

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Prof Tony Lavender

Speaker
Professor Tony Lavender’s first degree was from Swansea University in Psychology. His postgraduate professional training was at the Institute of Psychiatry. His Doctorate, on service evaluation in mental health, was from Kings College, University of London. Throughout most of his career he has retained clinical contact with people who have severe and long term mental health problems. He has published extensively on aspects of service delivery, clinical practice, the history and development of clinical psychology, workforce planning, quality assurance and the evaluation of mental health services and understanding psychosis. He was Programme Director of Salomons Clinical Psychology Doctorate Programme for 21 years and has been influential in developing nationally agreed standards in postgraduate training and in establishing Doctorate qualifications in Applied Psychology. He has been working at Canterbury Christ Church University since 1996.
He has considerable experience of establishing quality assurance systems in a range of organisations including NHS Mental Health Services and Higher Education. He has played a leading role in workforce development nationally with the Department of Health, British Psychological Society, National Institute of Mental Health and the NHS Information Centre. Between 2005 and 2007 he was Joint Chair of the BPS/NIMHE group looking at ‘New Ways of Working for Applied Psychologists'. He is currently the BPS representative on the NHS/Centre for Wo

http://www.canterbury.ac.uk/business-school/Staff/Profile.aspx?staff=4426de9d0f9df207

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Laura Lea, Coordinator of Service User and Carer Involvement

Speaker
I have worked alongside people with severe and enduring mental health issues for over ten years. Working together as members of the public we have helped shape mental health services and mental health education. In recent years I have had my own experience of psychosis. New approaches to help people manage this experience are badly needed. It’s my hope that this publication will enable dialogue between service users and service providers about the best ways to manage the experiences that are known as psychosis.

http://www.canterbury.ac.uk/social-applied-sciences/ASPD/Staff/Profile.aspx?staff=4ab5d7e5bf65147b

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Dr Rufus May

Speaker
Rufus May has worked as a clinical psychologist in the NHS for 19 years. He is known for promoting holistic and creative approaches to mental health problems. His interest comes originally from his own experiences of psychosis and recovery in his late teens. He has an interest in mindfulness, community development and voice dialogue approaches. His work was featured in the Channel 4 film 'The Doctor who hear voices'

http://www.rufusmay.com/

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Dr Sara Meddings

Speaker
Sara Meddings works as a consultant psychologist; psychology and psychological therapies lead for recovery and wellbeing at Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust. She is one of the leads for the psychosis care pathway and Sussex Recovery College. She is also a consultant with ImROC (Implementing Recovery through Organisational Change) at the Centre for Mental Health / NHS confederation. She has over 20 years’ experience working with people with serious mental health challenges. Her work has mainly focused on working with people with distressing psychosis and their families, and in developing recovery oriented practice. She also draws on her personal experiences regarding mental health and wellbeing in her work.

http://www.sussex.ac.uk/spriglab/people

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Prof Tony Morrison

Speaker
Tony Morrison is a Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Manchester and is also Associate Director for Early Intervention at Greater Manchester West Mental Health Foundation Trust. He has published over 100 articles on cognitive therapy for psychosis and experimental studies of cognitive processes in psychosis, including an influential cognitive model of psychosis, and has conducted several treatment trials of cognitive therapy for psychosis and for people at high risk of psychosis. He has also published several treatment manuals. He has also conducted research examining the links between trauma and psychosis and has explored issues of patient choice and the facilitation of user-led research into psychosis and mental health services. He is currently a member of 2 NICE guideline development groups (Psychosis in children and young people; Adult Schizophrenia and Psychosis: update) and is a member of the Department of Health Expert Reference Group for development of a competency framework for CBT for psychosis. He is director of the Psychosis Research Unit at Greater Manchester West Mental Health Foundation Trust

http://www.psych-sci.manchester.ac.uk/staff/AnthonyPMorrison/

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Dr Emmanuelle Peters

Speaker
Dr Emmanuelle Peters is Reader in Clinical Psychology at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IOPPN), King’s College London, and an Honorary Consultant Clinical Psychologist for the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust (SLaM), where she is the director of a specialist outpatients psychological therapies service for psychosis (PICuP). She has specialized in psychosis for the past 25 years as a clinician, researcher and trainer. Her research interests include the continuum view of psychosis, cognitive models of psychotic symptoms, and Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for psychosis.
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Prof John Read

Speaker
After working for nearly 20 years as a Clinical Psychologist and manager of mental health services in the UK and the USA Dr Read joined the University of Auckland, New Zealand. There he published over 100 papers in research journals, primarily on the relationship between adverse life events and psychosis. He also researches the negative effects of bio-genetic causal explanations on prejudice, and the role of the pharmaceutical industry in mental health. John is on the Executive Committee of the International Society for Psychological and Social Approaches to Psychosis (www.isps.org) and editor of the ISPS’s scientific journal ‘Psychosis’. In May 2013, Dr Read took up the post of Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Liverpool.
His books include:
READ, J., DILLON, J. (eds.). (2013). Models of Madness: Psychological, Social and Biological Approaches to Psychosis, second edition.. Routledge
GEEKIE, J., RANDAL, P., LAMPSHIRE, D., READ, J, (eds.). (2012). Experiencing Psychosis: Personal and Professional Perspectives. Routledge.
READ, J., SANDERS P. (2010). A Straight Talking Introduction to the Causes of Mental Health Problems. PCCS Books.
GEEKIE, J., READ, J. (2010). Making Sense of Madness: Contesting the Meaning of Schizophrenia. Routledge.

http://www.liv.ac.uk/psychology-health-and-society/staff/john-read/

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Prof Mike Slade

Speaker
Mike is a Professor of Health Services Research at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, and a Consultant Clinical Psychologist in South London. His main research interests are recovery-focused and outcome-focused mental health services, user involvement in and influence on mental health services, wellbeing in psychosis, staff-patient agreement on need, residential alternatives to in-patient services, and contributing to the development of clinically useable outcome measures, including the Camberwell Assessment of Need and the Threshold Assessment Grid. He has written over 200 academic articles and 9 books, including Personal Recovery and Mental Illness (2009, Cambridge University Press) and the co-authored Partnering for Recovery in Mental Health (2014, John Wiley). His free booklets include Making Recovery a Reality (2008, download at www.centreformentalhealth.org.uk), REFOCUS: Promoting recovery in community mental health services (2011, download at researchintorecovery.com/refocus) and 100 Ways to Support Recovery (2013, download at rethink.org/100ways). Further information on his research programme is at researchintorecovery.com.

https://kclpure.kcl.ac.uk/portal/mike.slade.html

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Prof Til Wykes

Speaker
I am a Professor of Clinical Psychology and Rehabilitation at King’s College London and Director of the NIHR Mental Health Research Network.

I edit the Journal of Mental Health and I'm Vice Dean for Research at the Institute of Psychiatry. I have been involved in research on rehabilitation and recovery for people with severe mental illness for many years both in the development of services and the development and evaluation of innovative psychological treatments. My main current research themes concentrate on how to improve thinking difficulties so people can take advantage of opportunities for recovery and how to increase therapeutic activities in acute mental health services.

I founded and I am now Co-Director of the Service User Research Enterprise (SURE), which encourages consumers of mental health services to become more involved in research. The unit is the first in the UK to concentrate on including the service user perspective by employing people who have experience of using mental health services.

I also continue to be a Consultant Clinical Psychologist working on an intensive care ward within the Maudsley Hospital.

https://kclpure.kcl.ac.uk/portal/til.wykes.html

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Dr Geraldine Strathdee

Speaker
Geraldine is NHS England’s National Clinical Director for Mental Health and a consultant psychiatrist at Oxleas NHS FT. She co-chairs the National mental health system board, which brings the new system partners together to implement the national mental health strategy. She is the clinical lead for the Mental health intelligence network and the national CCG mental health leadership programme. Her passionate commitment is to the translation of best practice standards into routine clinical practice. Current programmes which seek to do just that include: the national reducing premature mortality CQUIN, introduction of access and waits standards for early intervention psychosis, crisis and IAPT , Crisis Concordat, Primary care mental health development, promotion of positive mental health and resilience and employment . She is privileged to have the expertise and support of many networks of exceptional mental health leaders to help achieve the ambitions for mental health care in England’s Five-year Forward view. Previous roles included National Professional Adviser to Healthcare Commission and CQC, London Strategic health authority mental health lead and she was awarded the prestigious Psychiatrist of the Year in 2012.
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Antonia Borneo

Speaker
Antonia is Head of Policy & Development at Rethink Mental Illness, and has worked for the charity since 2006. Her work is currently focused on seeking improvements to care and treatment for psychosis and schizophrenia, following on from the Schizophrenia Commission. She is keen to support a greater emphasis on psychologically informed approaches, through influencing national policy, and supporting shared learning between provider organisations. Antonia studied Psychology at Surrey University, with a particular focus on personal narratives and identity.
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Richard Pemberton, DCP Chair

Speaker
To follow
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Jo Hemmingfield

Speaker
Jo Hemmingfield is the British Psychological Society, Division of Clinical Psychology English lead for Experts by Experience. She is part of the Division's Executive Committee. Jo frequently speaks alongside the DCP Chair and is involved in many aspects of the DCP's work. Jo was privileged to be a member of the working party for Anne Cooke's similar document "Understanding Bipolar Disorder".
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Dr Alison Brabban

Speaker
Alison qualified as a Clinical Psychologist in 1990 and now works for Tees, Esk and Wear Valleys NHS Foundation Trust as the Clinical Lead for Recovery and for the Early Intervention in Psychosis Service. She is also an Honorary Clinical Senior Lecture at Durham University. Over the years she has worked in a number of clinical settings and has developed a special interest in the application and implementation of psychological therapies for psychosis. She was given a visiting senior lectureship at Harvard University Medical School in 2006 and was also awarded a scholarship to the Beck Institute for Cognitive Therapy and Research in Philadelphia. Alison now works as the National Advisor for Severe Mental Illness for the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies programme within NHS England. She was also recently on the group that updated the NICE guideline for schizophrenia and psychosis and was part of the Schizophrenia Commission.
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Thurstine Basset

Speaker
Thurstine Basset worked as a social worker before becoming involved in mental health training and education. He has worked independently as a training consultant since 1985. He is a Director of Basset Consultancy Ltd. (www.bassetconsultancy.co.uk) and has published widely in the mental health field. He has co-edited three books for Wiley: Blackwell – Teaching Mental Health (2007), Learning about Mental Health Practice (2008) and Voices of Experience (2010). He was the lead author for the training package ‘Psychosis Revisited’ which evolved from the earlier BPS publication 'Understanding mental illness: recent advances in understanding mental illness and psychotic experiences' (June 2000). He is currently co-writing two books – one on therapeutic work with boarding school survivors and the other on the family caregiver role in mental health.
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Luciana Berger MP

Speaker
Luciana Clare Berger is a British Labour Co-operative politician who has been the Member of Parliament for Liverpool Wavertree since 2010. She was appointed Shadow Minister for Public Health.
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Prof Sir Robin Murray

Speaker
Robin Murray is Professor of Psychiatric Research at the Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College and indeed has spent most of his working life there apart from one year at NIMH in the USA; fortunately this did him little harm. His particular interest is in psychosis, and he and his colleagues have contributed to the understanding that environmental factors such as obstetric events, drug abuse and social adversity dysregulate striatal dopamine and thus increase the risk of psychosis; he is currently most interested in gene-environmental interactions. He is also involved in testing new treatments for psychotic illnesses, and cares for people with psychosis at the South London and Maudsley NHS Trust. He has written over 700 articles, not all of them boring! He is the most frequently cited psychosis researcher outside the USA, has supervised 52 PhDs and 40 of his students have become full professors. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 2010 and received a knighthood in 2011.
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Rachel (Rai) Waddingham

Speaker
Rai is the manager of the London Hearing Voices Project at Mind in Camden, developing innovative projects to support young people who hear voices and bring Hearing Voices Groups to prisons. She is a trustee of the National Hearing Voices Network, a member of Intervoice’s International Research Committee, an independent trainer/consultant (with Behind The Label Training & Consultancy) and a media spokesperson.
Being a voice hearer herself and having spent more than 14 years in the psychiatric system, Rai is passionate about the role of self help and peer support in recovery from extreme states of mind. She is particularly interested in the link between trauma, dissociation and psychosis, as well as holistic approaches which support people to make sense of their experiences in a way that works for them. Rai is committed to increasing the range of alternatives available within, and without, the mental health system.
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Sam Challis

Speaker
Working at Mind since 2010, Sam is Information Manager, responsible for leading a team developing Mind’s health and social care information products, which are published online and in print. He additionally provides internal specialist information support to other teams within Mind and regularly appears in the media as one of Mind’s team of spokespeople. Prior to working at Mind, Sam worked across the public sector in varied roles including workplace wellbeing policy development and education.

Venue

The Light, Friends House, London

173-177 Euston Road , London , NW1 2BJ •  Website•  Directions

Situated directly opposite Euston station, we are also within walking distance of King’s Cross and the Eurostar at St Pancras. In addition, Friends House has excellent underground links via the Northern and Victoria lines. Overground services include links from Watford Junction, Birmingham, Manchester and Glasgow.

Additional Information

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