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ATP Annual Conference 2015

Friday 10th July 2015 - Sunday 12th July 2015 at Lancaster University

The ATP conference is for teachers of psychology and will offer updating sessions on psychology, presentations and workshops on teaching and learning, and opportunities to share good practice. View the Programmeand Breakout Programme

It is the number one CPD event for teachers of psychology in the UK

The three-day ATP Annual conference boasts over 50 workshops to enhance your CPD on a wide range of topics from teaching and learning to current research. We offer full and half conference packages as well as one-day CPD events. Delegates who book the one-day package are welcome to join us for our evening wine reception, giving you invaluable time to network and socialise. We look forward to welcoming you to the 2015 conference whether you are old friends or newcomers!

Regular contributors include the national Awarding Bodies as well as numerous authors, training providers and teachers.

The conference also attracts around 40 exhibitors including publishers and other providers of teaching resources.

Speaker Abstracts

Alan Collins, Lancaster University - Long-deceased white males, redundant facts and obsolete theories: Why would anyone study the history of psychology?
It is not beyond the realms of possibility to imagine a disgruntled student of psychology arguing that: “There is no obvious reason why I should study the history of psychology any more than a student of physics should study the history of physics. As psychologists we are scientists interested in understanding how or why people behave as they do, not in what happened in the past. The history of psychology has no place in the psychology curriculum or the discipline of psychology because it tells us nothing about people.” While historians might (rightly) jibe at the idea that historical events and their interpretation have nothing to tell us about how people behave, with that considerable caveat accepted, you can see the student’s points: they are familiar but nonetheless powerful criticisms. Given the above, why do I study the history of psychology? What do I think it contributes to psychology? And why do I think it worth inflicting on others?

In this talk I want to draw on some recent – well, recent for a historian – ideas about the value of historical perspectives and to illustrate them using historical case studies. I want to make three arguments. The first is that history can provide a far richer and more revealing answer to the question of ‘What is psychology?’ than the usual textbook response ‘The science of mind/behaviour/brain’. The second is a claim that there is a particular relationship between psychology and the things it studies such that the very act of studying can change those things and how we think of ourselves. The third is that history provides perspective in a way that is not available via the study of contemporary psychology but this perspective can enhance contemporary psychology and psychologists. The three arguments are more slippery than they might seem but I hope to make them more concrete by using particular examples to illustrate them: histories of the testing of individual differences, the history of the psychological concept of memory, and the history of tests of self-esteem.

Top ten reasons why the ATP 2015 Annual Conference offers essential CPD and great value-for-money

  • Workshops on how to produce 'Outstanding Lessons' for Ofsted, including how to show progress, run by an outstanding teacher
  • The opportunity to meet and network with other teachers who have had recent Ofsted experience in their schools/colleges
  • Updates on the major changes to psychology specifications - due for first teaching in 2015
  • Face-to-face meeting with key representatives from all the exam boards
  • Opportunities to meet with specification designers and examiners
  • A wide range of high quality breakout events based on teaching and learning - many of the teaching ideas shared are transferable across subjects
  • A chance to refresh and recharge and to come back with renewed enthusiasm for the academic year ahead
  • Timed so that it is post-exam and students will not miss out on key learning
  • Opportunity to meet lecturers from the school of psychology
  • Cost effective - a three day, all inclusive conference that is the same price as many one-day CPD events

Visit the dedicated Conference website: www.atpconference.org.uk Email: if@hapognotet.r

Membership Information

In order to keep conference costs low for you, delegates are required to be members. The non-member fee provides temporary ‘membership’ status for the duration of the conference but without the advantage of receiving ATP Today magazine three times a year and or other benefits. To sign up to be a member (and save £5 on the conference fee), simply follow the link to pay via PayPal or standing order: http://theatp.org/join

Accommodation Information

Arrivals on Thursday 9th July should check in at the FASS building (number 21 on the campus map). Check in time is from 2pm – the reception there will be manned until 11pm and anyone arriving after 11pm will need to collect keys from the security reception (building 34 on the campus map).

If you have any queries please contact us via the event hotline on 01332 227771.

Agenda

Friday 10th July 2015

Further information can be found on the draft breakout programme, which can be downloaded at the end of the event page.

10:00Arrival, welcome and registration Charles Carter Building
10:30Breakout Session 1: (there will be a choice of two workshops for the CPD day, all delegates are welcome to join in if they arrive in sufficient time)
11:30Breakout Session 2: (there will be a choice of two workshops for the CPD day, all delegates are welcome to join in if they arrive in sufficient time)
12:00Exhibition opens: publishers and educational suppliers from around the UK in James Fox building
12:30Lunch
13:00Meet and greet for the Workshop Facilitators in exhibition hall
13:30CONFERENCE OPENS Introduction and welcome
14:00KEYNOTE: Prof Mark Levine, University of Exeter, George Fox lecture theatre
15:00Breakout Events (1)
16:00Refreshments
16:30Breakout Events (2)
18:45‘Getting to know you’ for newcomers & anyone else who’s come alone, (Barker House farm building – bar area)
19:15Pre-dinner wine reception sponsored by the Lancaster University Psychology department (Barker House Farm)
20:00Evening meal and a choice of quiz or treasure hunt (Barker House Farm)

Saturday 11th July 2015

Further information can be found on the draft breakout programme, which can be downloaded at the end of the event page.

07:30Breakfast (Barker House farm)
07:55Woodland walk and relaxation session (Meet Barker House farm)
09:00Breakout Events (3)
10:15KEYNOTE: Dr Graham Mitchell, University of Northampton
11:15Morning Refreshments
11:45Breakout Events (4)
12:45Lunch
13:45KEYNOTE: Professor Chris French, Goldsmiths, University of London
15:00Breakout Events (5)
16:00Refreshments
16:30ATP Annual General Meeting
18:45Wine Reception (Barker House Farm)
19:30Conference Dinner and Karaoke/disco (Barker House farm)

Sunday 12th July 2015

Further information can be found on the draft breakout programme, which can be downloaded at the end of the event page.

07:30Breakfast (Barker House farm building)
09:00Breakout Events (6)
10:00Keynote: Dr Alan Collins, University of Lancaster - Long-deceased white males, redundant facts and obsolete theories: Why would anyone study the history of psychology?
11:00Morning refreshments
11:30Breakout event (7)
12:30Looking to the Future (main lecture theatre)
13:15Lunch
14:00CONFERENCE CLOSES
14:05Go home inspired for a new academic year!

Speakers and Facilitators

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Dr Alan Collins, Lancaster University

Keynote Speaker
Dr Alan Collins main research interests are in history of psychology and psychiatry. In particular, he is interested in how psychology has adopted and changed concepts, such as memory, and how understanding the history of a concept gives us insight into how it is currently being used. More generally, he is interested in how psychological ideas and practices might change how we view ourselves and others. He is also interested in how psychology has evolved in the UK and how examining this history can help us better understand matters such as the role of psychology in modern British society, the relationships between intellectual and craft skills, and disciplinary demarcation.
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Professor Mark Levine, Exeter University

Keynote Speaker
Groups, Violence and Bystander Behaviour
In this talk I will discuss recent developments in the social psychology of pro-social and anti-social behaviour – with a particular focus on the ‘bystander effect’. I will argue that, contrary to traditional textbook approaches to bystander behaviour, group process can play a part in promoting helping and also in tackling violence. I will describe field experiments, analysis of CCTV footage of violence and experiments in fully immersive virtual reality, which all explore bystander behaviour in violent or dangerous emergencies. I will argue that an understanding of the social identity relationships between perpetrators, victims and bystanders is central to the establishment of safer public spaces
Mark Levine is a Professor of Social Psychology at the University of Exeter. His research focuses on the role of social identity in pro-social and anti-social behaviour. His recent work, supported by both the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) examined the role of group processes in the regulation of perpetrator, victim and bystander behaviour during aggressive and violent events. He is currently involved in 3 EPSRC funded projects exploring the role of identities and behaviour in the digital age. These are all interdisciplinary collaborations with colleagues from departments of psychology, computer science, engineering, mathematics, animation and robotics
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Professor Chris French, Goldsmiths, University of London

Keynote Speaker
Summary: Ever since records began, in every known society, a substantial proportion of the population has reported unusual experiences many of which we would today label as “paranormal”. Opinion polls show that the majority of the general public accepts that paranormal phenomena do occur. Such widespread experience of and belief in the paranormal can only mean one of two things. Either the paranormal is real, in which case this should be accepted by the wider scientific community which currently rejects such claims; or else belief in and experience of ostensibly paranormal phenomena can be fully explained in terms of psychological factors. This presentation will describe some of the findings from 15 years research at the Anomalistic Psychology Research Unit at Goldsmiths, covering such topics as dowsing, psychics, alien abduction, sleep paralysis, and memory for anomalous experiences.

Dr Graham Mitchell University of Northampton

Keynote Speaker
Teaching Positive Psychology: Strengths and Strategies
Positive psychology is about well-being, thriving, achievement and optimal development. Although positive psychology is not new, it has emerged more recently as an important and popular area in university psychology teaching. This presentation will look at reasons for its popularity and its use in the teaching of A-level Psychology. The roots of positive psychology will be examined before focusing on three important research findings that can have immediate application in the classroom and beyond. Some consideration will be given to the positive psychology activities of a group of school, college and university psychology teachers. Information will also be provided on how to keep up to date in this area.
Dr Graham Mitchell is Subject Leader for Psychology at the University of Northampton. Before working in universities, he taught A-level Psychology in school and college. His research interests lie in the area of Positive Psychology, particularly the role of hope and other self-belief variables in achievement and recovery. Graham teaches on three Positive Psychology modules. He can be contacted at: graham.mitchell@northampton.ac.uk

Venue

Lancaster University

George Fox and Charles Carter Buildings , Bailrigg , Lancaster , LA1 4YW •  Directions

Arrivals on Thursday 9th July should check in at the FASS building (number 21 on attached map). Check in time is from 2pm – the reception there will be manned until 11pm and anyone arriving after 11pm will need to collect keys from the security reception (building 34 on the attached map).